Poulfur School Window Installation

Poulfur Window Installation


Poulfur Window Installation. This post follows on from the previous Poulfur Window and the Poulfur School Commission posts.

Poulfur School Window Installation before fitting the secondary frame.

With all the sixteen panels and the two frames complete it was now time to install the window. The first job was to fix the two secondary frames into the window recesses top and bottom. These frames will fit flush up to the window, exactly matching the existing frame. Once they are in place we will fit the sixteen separate panels that make up the whole installation.

Poulfur School Window secondary frames fitted

Frames installed and the first big sigh of relief. You can see from the pictures above that both secondary frames have a cross-member fitted. This provides added strength and support for the leaded panels which we will begin to fit now.

Fitting The Panels


Poulfur School Window first two panels fitted

We have decided to start in the top left-hand corner and work across and down. The upper frame is actually six inches taller than the lower frame. Here are the first two panels in situ, so far so good

Poulfur School Window three panels fitted

This is panel no three showing the very top of the lighthouse installed. This is the largest panel in the whole installation so we were glad to see it in place. Second big sigh of relief, this concluded our first days’ work.

Poulfur Window Installation Day Two


Poulfur School Installation 5 panels installed in top section

Day 2 and we now only have one more panel to fit in the top section, everything lining up and progressing well.

Top section completed and two left-hand side panels installed in the bottom section

The top section completed and two left-hand side panels of the lower section fitted.

Upper section completed three panels fitted in lower section

We were glad to see this central panel in place as it is the focal point of the whole installation.

Poufur School Window Installation completed

Poulfur School Window Installation completed! Here is the finished window photographed from the upper floor through a glass screen. There is a floor to ceiling glass screen on the upper floor that allows a full view of the window.

Poulfur School Window

Poulfur School Window


 

Welcome to the second part of the Poulfur School Window story. In the last post, I covered the design and the construction of the top four panels in the upper section. I am now moving onto the lower four panels in the upper section. Once again I have started with the largest panel which contains most of the detail of the lighthouse.

Lighthouse Panel


Poulfur School Window lighthouse panel

I have managed to incorporate four plain bevels into the light section here. Three of which I have had to cut, these are the only pieces of clear glass in the whole installation. They appear white here due to the paper pattern underneath the glass. This can be a little disconcerting during construction but I am sure it will look very effective.

Poulfur School window lighthouse bevels close up

Here is a close up of the bevel pieces. I have used Spectrum Waterglass on either side to add to the effect of shining light. English Muffle and other textured glass were also used in the window to give it some ” sparkle ” if you will.

Here is a large image of the panel with the light coming through. You can now see the effects of the different glass textures. Its also worth noting how the light changes the colors of the glass

The Three Side Panels


With this panel completed, I then move onto the three smaller side panels. Here they are after cementing and you can see the different glass textures. Once the cement has dried they will receive a thorough cleaning before installation. With these eight panels finished this completes the top section of the window.

The Lower Window Section


Poulfur School Window Lower section left hand side panels

Moving on to the bottom section of the window, I took a different approach by making the side panels first. Here are panels 9 and 10 in situ in the frame before the cementing process.

Poulfur School Window, upper central panel in the lower section

The central panel was quite important in the appearance of the window. This involved some tricky cuts so by doing it last I was able to line everything up.

Central panel with right-hand side panel

Here is the central panel with the right-hand side panel. The gap between the two panels is 150mm which represents the frame, you can now see how everything lines up.

 

Central panel with left-hand side panel

The left-hand side panel is shown here with the central panel. These four panels complete the third section of the window.

The Final Four Panels


Once again I have started with the outside panels. The right-hand side has one panel and the two go on the left.

Final three side panels Poulfur School Window

I have added the flowers to introduce a bit more colour into the composition. The red and white represent the school sports colours. They are also the colours of the local Fethard-on-Sea GAA club St Mogues.

The Final Panel


 

Here is the central panel under construction. There are a lot of curves in this panel which made it very labour intensive.

Poulfur School window final panel under construction

Here is the panel completely cut and ready for soldering at all the joints, followed by cementing.

Final Panel all cut and leaded
We now have all sixteen panels completed. Next up will be installing the frames and hoping everything lines up, fingers crossed.

Poulfur School Commission

Poulfur School Commission


This year we have a commission to supply and fit a stained glass window in the new Poulfur School building. This is under the % for art scheme which provides arts funding to new buildings. The installation will be above the entrance doors at the front of the building. It will be visible from both the first and ground floor levels. Space comprises an upper and lower section total size approx 12 ft high by 9 ft 3ins wide.

Poulfur School Window, upper and lower sections of proposed stained glass window installation.
View from the ground floor
Poulfur School Window view from the first floor
Poulfur School Window view from the first floor

The design stage


After discussions with the Board of Management, we agreed upon the design above. This assumed a square-shaped window but this had changed after the installation of the frame. So we then had to incorporate the design into the available space. Armed with all the measurements we drafted a working drawing. A secondary interior frame would house the glass panels.

The Working Drawing


This proved to be a lengthy process and definitely worth taking some time over. With the working drawing complete to scale the full-size patterns were then prepared. We had all the measurements to construct the secondary frame. This would then gives us the template sizes for all individual panels.

First Panel
Poulfur School First Panel in progress At this point, I had a rough idea of the colors and glass types I was going to use. I figured it would be best to start at the top of the installation. It would then be easier to make any adjustments as I worked down the design. I prefer to work this way as it keeps everything looking fluid and fresh.
First panel completed This was also the largest panel, the top section being 6 inches taller than the bottom section. Having completed this panel I then moved on to the side panels. I now had the benefit of being able to view these placed next to the large panel.

Right-Hand Side Panel

Right-hand side panel There is only one panel on the right-hand side so I have done this first. The frame between these two panels is 6 inches wide and I have made an allowance for this.

Left-Hand Side Panels

Left-hand side inner panel The inner panel on the left-hand side is about 2 inches thinner than the outside panel. There is also an allowance for two 6 inch frame pieces on this side of the window.

Left and Right-Hand Side Panels

Right-hand and Left-hand side panels Here are the three smaller panels together, two left and the one on the right. It’s also important to note that the glass will completely change color once lit from behind.

Two Left-Hand Panels

 

Two Left-hand side panels back lit Here are the two left-hand panels with the light behind them spaced 6 inches apart to replicate the frame. As you can see from the previous photo some of the glass now looks clear. This is because it is very pale and when all the window is complete everything will blend together. This completes the top four panels.

Owl in the Moonlight

Owl in the Moonlight


Introduction


Owls are steeped in symbolism and folklore throughout many different cultures. From the ancient Egyptians, Chinese and Native American Indians to name but a few. The Celts believed it was the wisdom of the Owl that gave it the knowledge of the underworld path. So a fascinating subject and also quite popular in the world of stained glass design. Here is my contribution an “Owl in the Moonlight” stained glass panel. This piece now takes pride of place in a Reiki Healing Studio in County Wexford Ireland.
I have used a dark blue Spectrum Waterglass for the sky and an ice white Youghiogheny Stipple Glass for the moon. These two glasses work so well together, the blue reflects the light whereas the white is very opaque. I have picked the branches out with a solid black glass to complete the upper background. The Owl sits in the foreground atop a tree stump at the centre of the composition. It took me a few days to produce this pattern and I am very happy with the end result.

 

Owl in the Moonlight
Owl in the Moonlight © David Kennedy 2016




Stained Glass Pattern Information


Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 18 inch x 24 inch, ( 457 mm x 610 mm ) across eight pages. Instructions provided for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to print this pattern.

Copyright information


Owl in the Moonlight PDF Pattern (© David Kennedy Designs) copyright 2016. All rights reserved.
It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy.
Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on other websites.


The full-size pattern for this Owl in the Moonlight Panel is available in the pattern store.

Owl in the Moonlight PDF
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Clann Credo

Clann Credo


Clann Credo recently celebrated their 20th anniversary as Irelands leading provider of community finance. Since 1996 they have supported over 800 projects with almost €80 million of social finance. They provide loans to community groups, charities and local enterprises. This enables them to achieve their social and economic potential on terms and conditions that would not be available to them commercially.

Clann Credo logo

Introduction

The story of this piece began with an approach by the CEO Mr Paul O’Sullivan. He wanted to create a panel based on their logo for Sister Magdalen Fogarty, one of the founder members. This was to be as a presentation on the upcoming occasion of her retirement from the board of directors. The panel was to be small enough to hang in a window and framed in wood. The CEO had an idea of re-creating the Clann Credo logo as Sister Magdalen was a big stained glass fan. This would combine two things that were very close to her heart.

First pattern draft

This is the first draft of the pattern I drew up. The ellipse part with the colors was straightforward enough but I wasn’t sure at this stage of the size of the lettering and how it would work within the space.

 Cut and leaded

We agreed on the idea and then I made the templates and proceeded to cut out the glass. Lead came forms the outside of the panel as this works much better with the design. I have settled on copper foil for the lettering as it is very intricate and would look better with a finer line.

Clann Credo with lettering foiled

Here is the panel with the letters wrapped in copper foil ready to be soldered. You can see the difference between the thickness of the foil as opposed to the lead lines.

Clann Credo framedSoldering complete, cleaned polished and framed with reclaimed pitch pine. The finished size is 400mm x 520mm.


The Presentation by President of Ireland Michael D Higgins to Sister Magdalen Fogarty at Dublin Castle.

Presentation

For more information on the excellent work of Clann Credo: https://www.clanncredo.ie/

Large Lantern

Large Lantern


This Large Lantern was a commission piece for a girl’s second-level school in Co Waterford Ireland. The school was a new building replacing a much older construction and did not have a chapel. The board had designated a room within the school to use as a place for prayer and contemplation. This is where the lantern would provide a focal point and create a pastoral atmosphere.

Large Lantern, stained glass lantern with two amber crosses on a red background, green oak leaf on an amber background and blue top with finial.
Large Lantern

The Design Elements


A lantern this large wasn’t something I had made before but I would always tackle anything that comes along. That to me is the whole point of doing commission work. It takes you out of your comfort zone and stretches your skillset. The first idea I had was for a cross design which I would place on opposite sides. As for the other two sides, one was to house an opening for a candle, so I created a simple frame top and bottom. Leaving the final panel in which I placed the oak leaf. This was one of the school’s symbols and worked well with the other elements so completed the design.

Large Lantern Oak Leaf section of stained glass lantern, green leaf and amber background
Oak Leaf Section

The Construction


I made cardboard templates of the four sides and top and bottom sections and drew out my designs. Using 1/4 inch lead came I put together the two cross-sections and the oak leaf section. I then cut out the top and bottom pieces and attached 1/4 inch “U” came to the sides of all the sections. All the lead came was then cleaned with “0000” steel wool before soldering. The red and amber are WaterGlass, the blue glass on the top is Rough Rolled and the oak leaf is a piece of Kokomo. A small brass finial finishes off the top.

Large Lantern Opening Section of stained glass lantern, amber colored glass.
Large Lantern Opening Section

Large Lantern with Koi Fish panel behind
Large Lantern with Koi Fish

 

Two Magnolias

Two Magnolias 


This is a small Two Magnolias panel and was a commission piece.

Two Magnolias, a small rectangle stained glass panel of two pink magnolia flowers on a mardi gas glass background with ring mottle border
Two Magnolias

Created to go in front of a small bathroom window. Hence the obscure “Mardi Gras Glass” in the background. The size dictated the composition, only enough space for two flowers. It’s amazing what you can create by using different textured glasses. The flowers are a pink opal Bullseye Glass, which is quite opaque. The background uses another Bullseye Glass called “Mardi Gras” which has fractures in it. Finally, the border is a light green Uroboros Ring Mottle Glass, perfect for creating a few shadows. 4 x 4 “U” came provides a nice neat finish to the panel. The pattern for this charming little panel is available in the pattern store.

Stained Glass Pattern Information


Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 12 inch x 17 inch, ( 305 mm x 432 mm ) across four pages. Instructions are included for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to print this pattern.

 

Copyright Information


This Two Magnolias PDF Pattern( © David Kennedy Designs) copyright 2020. All rights reserved. It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy. This stained glass pattern is for personal use only. Permission allowed for limited use of this stained glass pattern for projects to sell at local crafts shops. Raising funds for charity at auctions or raffles is also allowed. Any postings online of finished projects also allowed. If you would please give credit to David Kennedy Designs for the pattern as a courtesy. Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on another website.

Two Magnolias PDF
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Hook Lighthouse

Hook Lighthouse 


This Hook Lighthouse Panel is a commission from a client in the United Kingdom. We live in a small fishing village called Slade, on the Hook Peninsula Co Wexford Ireland. As a result of this, we often receive commissions for the Hook Lighthouse. It is the oldest working lighthouse in the world and well worth a visit if you are in the sunny south-east of Ireland.
Hook Lighthouse panel with bevel pieces and a blue border, black and white lighthouse, designed by David Kennedy.

Brief Hook Lighthouse History


Built in the early 13th century by William Marshall, a Knights Templar to protect ships and their cargoes. A group of monks who lived on the peninsula helped with the construction before becoming the first keepers of the light. The building itself is a fine example of Irish medieval architecture. Standing four stories high with walls four meters thick, constructed from local limestone. Three rib vaulted chambers make up the lower section, the upper section housing the beacon. Wood, coal, whale oil and paraffin oil were all used as fuel for the light. Electricity finally became the power source in 1972 with light-sensitive switches. In 1996 the lighthouse went automatic and the last lightkeepers departed for good.

The Lighthouse Today


Five years later in 2001, the lighthouse opened to the public as a tourist attraction. The old keeper’s houses forming a cafe, gift shop and visitor centre. 2011 signalled the end of the sounding of the fog horn, a very sad day as I remember. Today the Hook Lighthouse is a major visitor attraction. You can take a guided tour and tread the 115 steps to the tower balcony which takes about 30 minutes. From here you can see the Wexford and Waterford coastlines stretching out for miles. It’s a tour I have done a few times and well worth the time. Allow a couple of hours at least to explore the whole site, it will be time well spent!

Holles Street Maple

Holles Street Maple


Holles Street Maple Panel, green background with Autumnal colored maple leaves, designed by David Kennedy
Holles Street Maple

About the Commission


Holles Street Maple panel is an adaptation of the framed ” Japanese Maple ” pattern.  Commissioned by the National Maternity Hospital at Holles Street in Dublin. Youghiogheny Stipple Glass forms the background and the leaves are Uroboros Granite Glass. The Granite glass has a rough surface texture which helps the leaves to sit in front of the background. This gives the viewer the feeling of looking through the trees and adds depth to the composition. The finished panel was encased in a sealed double – glazed unit size 1320mm x 470mm and installed in June 2014.

These Maple patterns are well suited to art glass as they come in so many different shapes and colors. I have also completed an “Autumn Maple” panel with red, gold and russet colors. The trees grow best in a sheltered environment, protecting them from wind and frost. They like neutral/acidic soil that does not dry out. This is important as they are quite shallow rooting trees. The Japanese Maples are the most decorative but they don’t like direct sunlight.

Hospital History


Holles Street Hospital, first established in 1894 through charitable donations. Was then granted a royal charter in 1903, along with other maternity hospitals in Dublin. It’s part of the history of the Irish Free State thanks to Elizabeth O’Farrell. Elizabeth trained and worked at the hospital as a midwife in the early 20th Century. Also a member of Cumann na mBan she carried the white flag to deliver the surrender at the Easter Rising in 1916. In 1930 the hospital was one of the first to benefit from “The Irish Hospitals Sweepstake”. This enabled expansion and redevelopment followed by a new charter in 1936. Fast forward to the present day and the hospital is due to move to new facility in 2024.