Poulfur School Window Installation

Poulfur Window Installation


Poulfur Window Installation. This post follows on from the previous Poulfur Window and the Poulfur School Commission posts.

Poulfur School Window Installation before fitting the secondary frame.

With all the sixteen panels and the two frames complete it was now time to install the window. The first job was to fix the two secondary frames into the window recesses top and bottom. These frames will fit flush up to the window, exactly matching the existing frame. Once they are in place we will fit the sixteen separate panels that make up the whole installation.

Poulfur School Window secondary frames fitted

Frames installed and the first big sigh of relief. You can see from the pictures above that both secondary frames have a cross-member fitted. This provides added strength and support for the leaded panels which we will begin to fit now.

Fitting The Panels


Poulfur School Window first two panels fitted

We have decided to start in the top left-hand corner and work across and down. The upper frame is actually six inches taller than the lower frame. Here are the first two panels in situ, so far so good

Poulfur School Window three panels fitted

This is panel no three showing the very top of the lighthouse installed. This is the largest panel in the whole installation so we were glad to see it in place. Second big sigh of relief, this concluded our first days’ work.

Poulfur Window Installation Day Two


Poulfur School Installation 5 panels installed in top section

Day 2 and we now only have one more panel to fit in the top section, everything lining up and progressing well.

Top section completed and two left-hand side panels installed in the bottom section

The top section completed and two left-hand side panels of the lower section fitted.

Upper section completed three panels fitted in lower section

We were glad to see this central panel in place as it is the focal point of the whole installation.

Poufur School Window Installation completed

Poulfur School Window Installation completed! Here is the finished window photographed from the upper floor through a glass screen. There is a floor to ceiling glass screen on the upper floor that allows a full view of the window.

Poulfur School Commission

Poulfur School Commission


This year we have a commission to supply and fit a stained glass window in the new Poulfur School building. This is under the % for art scheme which provides arts funding to new buildings. The installation will be above the entrance doors at the front of the building. It will be visible from both the first and ground floor levels. Space comprises an upper and lower section total size approx 12 ft high by 9 ft 3ins wide.

Poulfur School Window, upper and lower sections of proposed stained glass window installation.
View from the ground floor
Poulfur School Window view from the first floor
Poulfur School Window view from the first floor

The design stage


After discussions with the Board of Management, we agreed upon the design above. This assumed a square-shaped window but this had changed after the installation of the frame. So we then had to incorporate the design into the available space. Armed with all the measurements we drafted a working drawing. A secondary interior frame would house the glass panels.

The Working Drawing


This proved to be a lengthy process and definitely worth taking some time over. With the working drawing complete to scale the full-size patterns were then prepared. We had all the measurements to construct the secondary frame. This would then gives us the template sizes for all individual panels.

First Panel
Poulfur School First Panel in progress At this point, I had a rough idea of the colors and glass types I was going to use. I figured it would be best to start at the top of the installation. It would then be easier to make any adjustments as I worked down the design. I prefer to work this way as it keeps everything looking fluid and fresh.
First panel completed This was also the largest panel, the top section being 6 inches taller than the bottom section. Having completed this panel I then moved on to the side panels. I now had the benefit of being able to view these placed next to the large panel.

Right-Hand Side Panel

Right-hand side panel There is only one panel on the right-hand side so I have done this first. The frame between these two panels is 6 inches wide and I have made an allowance for this.

Left-Hand Side Panels

Left-hand side inner panel The inner panel on the left-hand side is about 2 inches thinner than the outside panel. There is also an allowance for two 6 inch frame pieces on this side of the window.

Left and Right-Hand Side Panels

Right-hand and Left-hand side panels Here are the three smaller panels together, two left and the one on the right. It’s also important to note that the glass will completely change color once lit from behind.

Two Left-Hand Panels

 

Two Left-hand side panels back lit Here are the two left-hand panels with the light behind them spaced 6 inches apart to replicate the frame. As you can see from the previous photo some of the glass now looks clear. This is because it is very pale and when all the window is complete everything will blend together. This completes the top four panels.

Hook Lighthouse

Hook Lighthouse 


This Hook Lighthouse Panel is a commission from a client in the United Kingdom. We live in a small fishing village called Slade, on the Hook Peninsula Co Wexford Ireland. As a result of this, we often receive commissions for the Hook Lighthouse. It is the oldest working lighthouse in the world and well worth a visit if you are in the sunny south-east of Ireland.
Hook Lighthouse panel with bevel pieces and a blue border, black and white lighthouse, designed by David Kennedy.

Brief Hook Lighthouse History


Built in the early 13th century by William Marshall, a Knights Templar to protect ships and their cargoes. A group of monks who lived on the peninsula helped with the construction before becoming the first keepers of the light. The building itself is a fine example of Irish medieval architecture. Standing four stories high with walls four meters thick, constructed from local limestone. Three rib vaulted chambers make up the lower section, the upper section housing the beacon. Wood, coal, whale oil and paraffin oil were all used as fuel for the light. Electricity finally became the power source in 1972 with light-sensitive switches. In 1996 the lighthouse went automatic and the last lightkeepers departed for good.

The Lighthouse Today


Five years later in 2001, the lighthouse opened to the public as a tourist attraction. The old keeper’s houses forming a cafe, gift shop and visitor centre. 2011 signalled the end of the sounding of the fog horn, a very sad day as I remember. Today the Hook Lighthouse is a major visitor attraction. You can take a guided tour and tread the 115 steps to the tower balcony which takes about 30 minutes. From here you can see the Wexford and Waterford coastlines stretching out for miles. It’s a tour I have done a few times and well worth the time. Allow a couple of hours at least to explore the whole site, it will be time well spent!