Slade Poppies Part 2

 

Slade Poppies Part 2


I have called this post ” Slade Poppies Part 2 ” as it is about bringing the top and bottom section together. The second row of flowers have now been added and at this point, I am quite happy with the way things are progressing. Even so one can never be sure exactly how it’s going to look once the backlighting is introduced. The method I use is to hold the glass up to the light and make my selection before cutting and proceed that way. It’s the same system I use for all my work, something I have developed over many years. A lot of glass artists like to mount their pieces on a sheet of clear glass using Blu Tack which is then held up to the light. This provides a comprehensive preview of the panel, although it would be fairly time-consuming.


Slade Poppies adding more flowers

 

With the top and bottom sections progressing so well I have now decided to build the two sides. This will help connect the two sections together. Starting out with the right-hand side which worked out well I then moved onto the left. I have also added a couple of blooms just above the leaves. Feeling pretty good about the way it’s going now and looking forward to filling in the middle section.

 

Slade Poppies filling in the sides

Slade Poppies Final Part

Slade Poppies ( Initial Stage )

 

Slade Poppies ( Initial Stage )First Cuts


There is never a particular place for starting to cut out the glass for a project. With this panel, I began by first cutting the leaves and soil pieces at the bottom of the panel. I was fairly confident with my glass choices here, using a  Youghiogheny stipple glass 4117 SP green, ice white, bluish-grey was for the leaves and a granite backed Uroboros 65 – 17 light & dark browns for the soil pieces. The spaces for the seed pods have been left empty at this stage as I will add them later when I have a better idea of the finished panel.


Slade Poppies top and bottom sections

 

The top and bottom background pieces were then cut from the whole sheet of Uroboros 10 – 16 light & dark browns, turquoise with mini fractures. This is can be tricky even with the use of a band saw so worth taking your time over. The two sides have worked out fine but the middle piece has broken off in slightly the wrong place. These things happen which means I will have to adjust the pattern slightly by moving a couple of flowers.

Slade Poppies ( Initial Stage ) Adding The Flowers



Slade poppies adding the flowers

With the first of the flowers cut I am able to position them on top of the background glass. I then mark around them using a fine permanent marker. The background can now be cut away using the band saw, leaving a perfect fit for the flower. This can be a slow process but the advantage is I am able to build up the image as I go. The glass used for the poppies is Uroboros 60 – 25 red & orange with white.

Slade Poppies flowers adjusted
Here I have managed to re-position the two flowers in the middle of the panel. This completes the top and bottom sections leaving the central part to do. However, now everything is back on track I am feeling confident of a successful outcome.

Slade Poppies Part 2

Round Apple Blossom

Round Apple Blossom Pattern


The Apple Blossom with its beautiful pink and white flowers is in fact a member of the rose family. Appearing from early May apple blossoms are larger and more robust than similar cherry blossoms. They produce a sweet scent that attracts bees and other insects. Flowering between 3 to 10 days when pollination occurs, after which time they lose their petals. They are also said to represent good fortune, hope and preference which make them a perfect subject for stained glass.

I have decided to stay with the ” Tiny Tiffany ” format of a 12-inch round panel for this Apple Blossom design. The background glass is a Uroboros fracture glass code 10-55 Cobalt Blue, White and Green. Gold pink and white, plus gold pink and purple make up the flowers and the leaves are light green with spring green highlights. This is a great project if you have lots of scrap art glass and makes a beautiful Mothers Day gift. You can display the panel in a window or placed it on a stand as shown here. The original panel size is 12 inches, ( 305 mm ) in diameter.Round Apple Blossom panel mounted in a crescent stand

 

The stand is available here

http://www.fireliteforms.com/category/39175338 

Stained Glass Pattern Information


Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 12-inch diameter, ( 305 mm x 305 mm ) across four pages. Instructions provided for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to print this pattern.

Copyright information


Round Apple Blossom Pattern. © David Kennedy Designs 2016. All rights reserved.
It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy.
Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on other websites.

The pattern for this piece is available in the pattern store as a PDF file. The original panel size is 12 inches which can be scaled up using the printing instructions included in the PDF download.

Round Apple Blossom PDF
popularity: 0
$5.99

Here is a link to a previous post covering the latter stages of construction of this Apple Blossom

Red Poppies Pattern

Red Poppies Pattern


A universal flower poppies symbolise peace, death and even sleep. In oriental cultures, they represent passionate love between couples. The Ancient Greeks in particular related the flower to Morpheus the god of sleep. This was most likely the source of the word Morphine which comes from Opium. Yet the inspiration for this Red Poppies Pattern comes from the Remembrance Poppies. Quite strange when you think about it as they are only paper flowers. Poppies of course come in a range of colors, blue, pink, white and orange spring to mind, a universal flower for sure. It is the state flower of California and also the birthday flower for August.

Red Poppies stained glass pattern design by David Kennedy

Made using Youghiogheny stipple glass, I have tried to keep the design simple and let the glass do the work. I have poppies growing wild in my garden and I am always struck by the way the red compliments the green surrounds. They also grow in clumps so I have crammed fourteen blooms into this panel. This post wouldn’t be complete without a link to Canadian poet and physician John McCrae’s beautiful poem ” In Flanders fields

Stained glass Pattern Information


If your interested in reproducing this panel it is now available as a PDF download in the Pattern Store.

A 916 mm ( approx 36 inches) x 368 mm ( 14.5 inches ) rectangle pattern.
Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 36 inches x 14.5 inches, ( 916 mm x 368 mm ) across six pages. Instructions supplied for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need “Adobe Acrobat Reader” to print this pattern.

Copyright information


 Red Poppies Stained Glass Pattern. (© David Kennedy Designs) copyright 2016. All rights reserved.
It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy.
Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on other websites.

This pattern is now available in the pattern store as a digital download:

Red Poppies PDF
popularity: 0
$9.99

Round Clematis Panel

Round Clematis Panel


So here is the completed Round Clematis Panel in the window. Lit from behind with natural daylight the background pink is picked up as hues in the flowers. The strip of waterglass emphasises the bottom of the panel, so it would have to be installed this way up. On the right-hand side, the fracture and streamer glass breaks up the background and creates a different light effect. I am happy with the way this has turned out as it has a contemporary feel to it. Also, it looks a lot different from the original smaller pattern but still works. This is particularly satisfying as it’s a primary aim I have when designing patterns. I try to make them as adaptable as possible as far as enlargement and re-sizing go. There is a link at the bottom to download the free pattern. The original pattern is 12″ (305mm) in diameter with instructions for enlarging supplied.

 

Completes Round Clematis stained glass panel, by David Kennedy
©David Kennedy 2019

Stained Glass Pattern Information


Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 12 inch x 12 inch, ( 305 mm x 305 mm ) across six pages. Instructions provided for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to print this pattern, available free at https://get.adobe.com/reader/.

For those of you who have followed this blog and would like to try a similar piece the original pattern is available here as a free download: Click here to download PDF pattern

For those of you who would like to view all available patterns: https://www.etsy.com/ie/shop/DavidKennedyDesigns

Copyright information


Halloween Skull PDF Stained Glass Pattern (© David Kennedy Designs) copyright 2020. All rights reserved.
It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy.
Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on other websites.

Hook Lighthouse

Hook Lighthouse 


This Hook Lighthouse Panel is a commission from a client in the United Kingdom. We live in a small fishing village called Slade, on the Hook Peninsula Co Wexford Ireland. As a result of this, we often receive commissions for the Hook Lighthouse. It is the oldest working lighthouse in the world and well worth a visit if you are in the sunny south-east of Ireland.
Hook Lighthouse panel with bevel pieces and a blue border, black and white lighthouse, designed by David Kennedy.

Brief Hook Lighthouse History


Built in the early 13th century by William Marshall, a Knights Templar to protect ships and their cargoes. A group of monks who lived on the peninsula helped with the construction before becoming the first keepers of the light. The building itself is a fine example of Irish medieval architecture. Standing four stories high with walls four meters thick, constructed from local limestone. Three rib vaulted chambers make up the lower section, the upper section housing the beacon. Wood, coal, whale oil and paraffin oil were all used as fuel for the light. Electricity finally became the power source in 1972 with light-sensitive switches. In 1996 the lighthouse went automatic and the last lightkeepers departed for good.

The Lighthouse Today


Five years later in 2001, the lighthouse opened to the public as a tourist attraction. The old keeper’s houses forming a cafe, gift shop and visitor centre. 2011 signalled the end of the sounding of the fog horn, a very sad day as I remember. Today the Hook Lighthouse is a major visitor attraction. You can take a guided tour and tread the 115 steps to the tower balcony which takes about 30 minutes. From here you can see the Wexford and Waterford coastlines stretching out for miles. It’s a tour I have done a few times and well worth the time. Allow a couple of hours at least to explore the whole site, it will be time well spent!

Blue Hydrangea’s

Blue Hydrangea’s


Blue Hydrangea's stained glass panel, designed by David Kennedy, Youghiogheny and Uroboros Art Glass.
Blue Hydrangea’s Stained Glass Panel

Hydrangeas grow everywhere in Ireland in almost every color. Some years ago my parents bought a small cottage with a view to retirement. Blue and pink hydrangea’s surrounded the property on all sides. They grew in front of whitewashed walls which enhanced the colors even more. These images stayed with me and when I was buying Art Glass I saw these colors again. So I had my glass all ready to go, I had my subject in my head and now all I needed was my design.
The panel started as a thumbnail sketch which I did whilst my son was having a half-hour piano lesson. These rough drawings I find are a great way of getting an idea down on paper. This was then developed into a full-size pattern which took me about four or five days to get right. Figuring out how best to represent the big mop heads was very time-consuming. I left a small amount of space in the upper right-hand corner for some white background glass to represent my wall. This didn’t work out as it was too opaque which sometimes happens with stained glass. So I ended up using a bluey-green Youghiogheny Stipple to give the panel some depth.

Stained Glass Pattern Information


The pattern for this Blue Hydrangea’s panel is available in the pattern store as a PDF file. The original panel size is 36 x 18 inches which can be scaled up or down using the printing instructions included in the PDF download.

Downloadable PDF pattern prints actual size 36 x 18 inches ( 916 mm x 457mm ) across ten pages. Instructions are provided for enlarging the pattern to your required size when printing. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to print this pattern.

Copyright Information


Blue Hydrangea’s Stained Glass Pattern. © David Kennedy Designs 2016. All rights reserved.
It is illegal to distribute this stained glass pattern online or in hard copy without written permission from David Kennedy.
Please do not post or distribute this stained glass pattern on other websites.

Blue Hydrangea PDF
popularity: 0
$9.99