Poulfur School Window 2

School Window 2

With the top four panels completed I can move onto the next four. Once again I have started with the largest panel which contains most of the detail of the lighthouse.

Panel no 7
Panel no 7

For the triangular sections in the lighthouse I have managed to incorporate four plain bevels, three of which I have had to cut. These are the only pieces of clear glass in the whole installation. They appear white here due to the paper pattern underneath the glass, this also effects the other colors in the panel and at times can be a little disconcerting.

Panel no 7 bevels
Panel no 7 bevels

Here is a close up of the bevel pieces, I have used Spectrum Water Glass on either side to add to the effect of shining light. English muffle and other textured glass were also used extensively throughout the window to give it some ” sparkle ” if you will.

Panel no 7 complete
Panel no 7 complete

Here is a large image of the panel with the light coming through and you can clearly see the effects of the different glass textures, its also worth noting how the light changes the colors of the glass. With this panel complete I then move onto the three smaller side panels.

Panels 5,6 & 8
Panels 5,6 & 8

With this panel complete I then move onto the three smaller side panels. Here they are in the process of being cemented and you can clearly see the different glass textures, after the cement is dry they will receive a thorough cleaning and polish before installation. With these eight panels finished that now completes the top section of the window.

 

 

Poulfur School Window Design

Poulfur School Window Design

School Window Design 1
School Window Design 1

After discussions with the board of management we submitted a number of designs and ideas for their consideration, the above design was eventually agreed upon. As this was based on a square shape we then had to make a working drawing of the whole window incorporating the design into the available space.A secondary frame would also be needed to house the glass panels.

School Window Design 2
School Window Design 2

This proved to be a fairly lengthy process and definitely worth taking some time over. Once we had the working drawing complete the full size patterns could then be drawn. We then had all the measurements to complete the secondary frame and templates could be cut for all individual panels.

Top panel no 3
Top panel no 3

Top Panel no 3

At this point I had a rough idea of the colors and glass types I was going to use so I figured it would be best to start at the top of the installation, it would then be easier to make any adjustments as I worked down the design. I prefer to work this way as it keeps everything fluid and fresh. I’m never quite sure how it’s going to look until it’s finished and I often get little ideas as I am progressing which I can then add. This was also the largest panel, the top section being 6 inches taller than the bottom section.

Panel no 3 complete
Panel no 3 complete

Having completed this panel I then moved on to the side panels, making some slight adjustments as I now had the benefit of being able to view them placed next to the large panel

Panel no 4
Panel no 4

Panel no 4

There is only one panel on the right-hand side so I have made this next. It is also important to remember that the frame between these two panels is 6 inches wide which is fairly substantial.

Panels no 2 & 3
Panels no 2 & 3

The inner panel on the left is about 2 inches thinner than the outside panel and of course there are two 6 inch frame pieces on this side of the window, all these different size panels had to be taken into account at the design stage.

Panels 1,2 & 4
Panels 1,2 & 4

Here are the three smaller panels together, two left and one on the right. It’s also important to note that the glass will completely change color once it is placed in front of the light.

 

Panels 1 & 2 in light
Panels 1 & 2 in light. 

Here are the two left-hand panels with the light behind them spaced 6 inches apart to replicate the frame. As you can see from the previous photo some of the glass now looks clear, that’s because it is very pale. When all of the window is done everything will blend seamlessly together ( hopefully ). This completes the top four panels of the upper section.

 

 

 

Poulfur School Window

Poulfur School Window
Poulfur School Window

Earlier this year we were commissioned to supply and fit a stained glass window in the new national school in Poulfur under the % for art scheme. This installation was to be placed above the entrance doors at the front of the building and would be visible from both the upstairs and downstairs, the space comprised of an upper and lower section overall size approx.12 ft high by 9 ft 3ins wide.

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Poulfur School Upper Window
Poulfur School Upper Window

The window viewed from upstairs.

Owl in the Moonlight GPQ

Owl in the Moonlight

This panel is featured as a full size pattern in the latest issue of Glass Patterns Quarterly along with a step by step tutorial, we are very proud to be able to contribute patterns to this excellent publication, here is the link https://www.glasspatterns.com/current-issue.html should you wish to purchase.

Owl in the Moonlight
Owl in the Moonlight

© David Kennedy 2016

Scene with irises

Scene with Irises

Scene with Irises
Scene with Irises
Scene with Irises close up
Scene with Irises close up

Effort number three in my ” Tiny Tiffany ” series is another scene, this time using irises which just work so well in stained glass. Getting some small pieces of yellow in here was a bit of a challenge but like to think I managed it ok. I find using the water glass really adds another dimension even though the piece is so small. This design is now available in the Patterns Store as a downloadable PDF pattern.

Tiny Tiffany Two

Tiny Tiffany Two

Tiny Tiffany 2
Tiny Tiffany 2

In this ” Tiny Tiffany Two “I’ve gone for a clematis design same size diameter as the ” scene with poppies “.I figure this will work best given the glass pieces I am trying to use up. The background here was quite tricky but it really brings the color in the flowers forward and gives some movement to the composition, turned out quite well I’m thinking..

On to the next one, I am keen to explore what other ” Tiffany’s ” will work in this design format.

clematis close up
clematis close up

A couple of close up pictures here.

Clematis closer
Clematis closer

Various Pieces in Studio

Various pieces in studio
Various pieces in studio

These are various pieces currently for sale in the studio, we make these up during the year in between commissions.

Wilhelmina Geddes.

Wilhelmina Geddes

Wilhelmina Geddes
Wilhelmina Geddes

‘An extraordinarily rich, evocative and psychologically penetrating study of a powerful artist and the times she lived through. Nicola Gordon Bowe has restored Wilhelmina Geddes to a central place in the Arts and Crafts movement and drawn a vivid portrait of the difficult life and personality of an original and uncompromising talent …

Bowe’s beautifully produced and illustrated book is a major addition to the artistic history of the era, and the part played by women in it; it is also a labour of love’, R.F. Foster, Carroll Professor of Irish History at the University of Oxford. ‘This magnificent book restores an almost forgotten figure to the history of modern art. Working in a medium that presents huge challenges and which is invariably neglected by mainstream art history, Wilhelmina Geddes emerges as a great creative force, a major artist. What Geddes achieved was extraordinary and in Dr Gordon Bowe she has found the perfect biographer’, Tanya Harrod, design historian and co-editor of the Journal of Modern Craft. SetWidth210-geddes5 <;SetWidth210-geddes3 SetWidth210-geddes1  Nicola Gordon Bowe’s magisterial new biography landed in bookshops last week with the force (and some of the weight – it’s about 2.5kg) of a small meteorite .. [it] makes for a fascinating tale … the text is shot through, as it should be, by glorious colour reproductions of the artist’s work, illuminating the narrative as her windows did churches … [it is] an epic work of scholarship, now published as Wilhelmina Geddes: life and work. Thanks to that, the Ireland of 2015 AD has reclaimed a long-lost daughter’, Frank McNally, Irish Times (November 2015). ‘Dubbed the “greatest stained glass artist of our time” upon her death in London in 1955, the Leitrim-born and Belfast-raised Geddes has been terribly overlooked since.

This stunningly illustrated, exhaustively researched and engagingly written book is clever and beautiful enough to spark a revival of appreciation,’ Cristín Leach Hughes, Sunday Times (November 2015). ‘As this marvellous book demonstrates, Wilhelmina Geddes was a forceful, original, modern artist of internationally important stature. Beautifully written and sumptuously illustrated, the book not only celebrate the achievements of – arguably – Ireland’s greatest 20th-century artist, but also reveals the epic potential of stained glass as an art form, one that can be equally powerful on the most monumental or miniature scales’, Peter Cormack, author of Arts & Crafts Stained Glass (2015). ‘What a monument of a book! So well-made and well-printed it shows [Geddes’] vast oeuvre … excellent photos … A book to read in one shot for all interested in or studying stained glass, as Geddes is a serious inspiration for future generations’, Angela van der Burght, Glass is More (November 2015). ‘An excellent new book … Gordon Bowe’s meticulous recovery of original material parallels her rewriting into history of this dazzlingly talented artist who was always an outsider’, Medb Ruane, Irish Arts Review (Dec. 2015/Feb. 2016). ‘An immense work, richly illustrated and deeply researched … it is a revelatory work, a beautifully produced showcase of an artist’s work … the images in this book, often of strong saints and prophets, forceful and determined characters such as Ulster still produces, provide more than enough for the reader at home to realise that here indeed was a truly great religious artist’, Peter Costello, Irish Catholic (November

 

http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2015/wilhelmina-geddes/reviews

Large Lantern

Large Lantern

Large Lantern
Large Lantern
Large Lantern ( oak leaf )
Large Lantern ( oak leaf )
Lantern and Koi
Lantern and Koi
Oak Leaf Lantern
Oak Leaf Lantern

This is a recent commission, I have never made a ” Lantern ” before but I always try to tackle anything that comes along. Spectrum glass was used for this piece, the red and amber are water glass and the blue top is rough rolled. The dark green oak leaf is a piece of Kokomo. Lead came was used to construct the four panels which were then soldered together, finally the finial was added to complete the project. © David Kennedy 2015